06 January 2009

Hadoscan: An Exciting New Technology



We are constantly researching new technologies at the Frequency Foundation and the Hadoscan is a very interesting tool for scanning the body all the way down to the cellular level. Photoanalysis can then determine frequencies that can alter scan results in a positive way.


See news item:

hadoscan is a bio-informational analysis system capable of visualizing patterns of information inbalances in the energetic human body. The system can assist in the reestablishment of a healthy information balance in clients.

hadoscan can accurately investigate the current level of informational regulation of the body's biofield and its subtle energetic pathways in the tissues. Clients have the opportunity to learn about the nature of existing imbalances and investigate which strategies will be the best to achieve a desired outcome.

hadoscan is based on the application of quantum regulatory effects occuring within biological systems. Every organ and cell has its own distinctive oscillation or wave frequency pattern. These vibratory signatures have been stored digitally in hadoscan's extensive database as graphically reproducible and comparable (resonance) information.

Each graph is a symbolic representation of the information exchange (resonance)between a specific energetic tissues of healthy individuals and is classified by their age and gender for comparison with a client's profile at the time of the investigation.

01 January 2009

Running Reduces Risk of Death More Than 50%

Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners
A 21-Year Longitudinal Study


Eliza F. Chakravarty, MD, MS; Helen B. Hubert, PhD; Vijaya B. Lingala, PhD; James F. Fries, MD

Arch Intern Med. 2008;168(15):1638-1646

Background Exercise has been shown to improve many health outcomes and well-being of people of all ages. Long-term studies in older adults are needed to confirm disability and survival benefits of exercise.

Methods Annual self-administered questionnaires were sent to 538 members of a nationwide running club and 423 healthy controls from northern California who were 50 years and older beginning in 1984. Data included running and exercise frequency, body mass index, and disability assessed by the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI; scored from 0 [no difficulty] to 3 [unable to perform]) through 2005. A total of 284 runners and 156 controls completed the 21-year follow-up. Causes of death through 2003 were ascertained using the National Death Index. Multivariate regression techniques compared groups on disability and mortality.

Results At baseline, runners were younger, leaner, and less likely to smoke compared with controls. The mean (SD) HAQ-DI score was higher for controls than for runners at all time points and increased with age in both groups, but to a lesser degree in runners (0.17 [0.34]) than in controls (0.36 [0.55]) (P < .001). Multivariate analyses showed that runners had a significantly lower risk of an HAQ-DI score of 0.5 (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.84). At 19 years, 15% of runners had died compared with 34% of controls. After adjustment for covariates, runners demonstrated a survival benefit (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.82). Disability and survival curves continued to diverge between groups after the 21-year follow-up as participants approached their ninth decade of life.

Conclusion Vigorous exercise (running) at middle and older ages is associated with reduced disability in later life and a notable survival advantage.

Running Reduces Your Risk of Death by Over 50%

Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners
A 21-Year Longitudinal Study


Eliza F. Chakravarty, MD, MS; Helen B. Hubert, PhD; Vijaya B. Lingala, PhD; James F. Fries, MD
Arch Intern Med. 2008;168(15):1638-1646

Background Exercise has been shown to improve many health outcomes and well-being of people of all ages. Long-term studies in older adults are needed to confirm disability and survival benefits of exercise.

Methods Annual self-administered questionnaires were sent to 538 members of a nationwide running club and 423 healthy controls from northern California who were 50 years and older beginning in 1984. Data included running and exercise frequency, body mass index, and disability assessed by the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI; scored from 0 [no difficulty] to 3 [unable to perform]) through 2005. A total of 284 runners and 156 controls completed the 21-year follow-up. Causes of death through 2003 were ascertained using the National Death Index. Multivariate regression techniques compared groups on disability and mortality.

Results At baseline, runners were younger, leaner, and less likely to smoke compared with controls. The mean (SD) HAQ-DI score was higher for controls than for runners at all time points and increased with age in both groups, but to a lesser degree in runners (0.17 [0.34]) than in controls (0.36 [0.55]) (P < .001). Multivariate analyses showed that runners had a significantly lower risk of an HAQ-DI score of 0.5 (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.84). At 19 years, 15% of runners had died compared with 34% of controls. After adjustment for covariates, runners demonstrated a survival benefit (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.82). Disability and survival curves continued to diverge between groups after the 21-year follow-up as participants approached their ninth decade of life. Conclusion Vigorous exercise (running) at middle and older ages is associated with reduced disability in later life and a notable survival advantage.